The Most Unusual, Strange and Amazing Houses

Where I run, along a street with similarly clad houses sheathed in wood paneling and fronted by little gardens of wild flowers, sits a totally strange house that looks like it landed in the middle of this neighborhood accidentally, maybe from space, or possibly from the Medieval past. It’s made entirely of a light brick, with a large turret and rounded edges and an almost Tutor-esque dark trim around windows and doors. I got to searching and it turns out unusual houses are actually not that unusual, and there are awesome examples of these unusual houses the world over. Check out some our favorite picks of unusual houses and structures.

Earth House Estate Lättenstrasse in Switzerland

Earth House Estate Lättenstrasse in Switzerland

Earth houses is a project designed by Peter Vetsch and are based on the interpretation of an environmentally conscious, ecological and progressive architecture. The pictures from this post are with a house named Earth House Estate Lättenstrasse, that is located in Dietikon, Switzerland. The aim of building an earth house is not to live under or in the ground, but with it. The earth-house concept uses the ground as an insulating blanket that efficiently protects it from rain, low temperatures, wind and natural abrasion. An earth house does not have to be built under the ground, it can be placed onto naturally grown terrain.

Earth House Interior

Earth House Interior

World’s Largest Treehouse

World’s Largest Treehouse

This world’s largest tree house cost $7 million to build! Located on the grounds of Alnwick Gardens,  Scotland, the house soars 56ft. above the ground and is connected with 4,000 square-feet of suspended walkways and has 6,000 square feet of living space.

Stilt House

Stilt House

Stilt houses or pile dwellings are houses raised on piles over the surface of the soil or a body of water. In the Neolithic and Bronze Age, stilt houses were common in the Alpine region. Remains have been found at the Mondsee and Attersee lakes in Upper Austria, for example.

Moberly Lake Log Cabin

Moberly Lake Log Cabin

The amazing home shown here is one of the largest log homes in the world. Another Canadian rambler, it is located on Moberly lake in British Columbia and has over 55,000 square feet of space.

Tent House

Tent House

Turf House

Turf House

Wichita grass house at Indian City, Anadarko, Oklahoma

Wichita grass house at Indian City, Anadarko, Oklahoma

The Underground Town of Coober Pedy

The Underground Town of Coober Pedy

Known by most as the opal capital of the world, the small town of Coober Pedy has quickly become one of Australia’s most popular tourist destinations. And that shouldn’t come as a big surprise since this is the world’s only underground town.

Ming Tang’s Bamboo Houses in China

Ming Tang’s Bamboo Houses in China

Ming Tang’s good-looking origami-inspired folding Bamboo Houses were planned to be use as a shelter in case of an earthquake. They have been constructed from renewable resources and can be fold into a diversity of shapes to withstand any earthquake.

Nautilus House, Mexico

Nautilus House, Mexico

Fanciful and strange, the shell-shaped Nautilus House in Mexico City hardly looks like a home. But even though the inside is just as unconventional as the outside – with carpets of plants, stone walkways and entirely curvilinear surfaces – a couple and their young children actually live there.

Conch House in the Caribbean

Conch Seashell House in the Caribbean

The Conch Shell House was built using a fairy traditional material, such as concrete, as well as recycled and found materials. In decoration of the house were used a lot of seashells and items found on the local beach.

Caribbean Seashell House

Caribbean Seashell House

The upstairs bathroom sink is made out of the base of a conch shell, the faucets are made out of coral.

Cave Dwelling in Afganistan

Cave Dwelling in Afganistan

This incredible “cave” dwellings have been cut in to natural cone-shaped rock formations in a village in Afghanistan.

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